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KANSAS  CITY  BREWERIES  COMPANY

Est. 1905

 

Kansas City Breweries Company

Old Fashioned Lager Recipe

Water is the most important ingrediance in beer. The geography of the water effects certain styles of beer. For example, England  is better for making stouts while the water in Australia is better for pale ales. Here in America good old fashioned lager is the brew of choice.  

Hops is the agent used for flavoring all beer but the amount of hops varies depending on the style of beer. Hops are dried and pelletted to use as the flavoring agent and the beginning of the process but can also be added later for more aroma and color.

Barley is the grain that is malted as a source of starches and sugars that when combined with yeast create alcohol. To extract the sugars, the grain is soaked in water, allowed to germinate and then dried in a kiln.

Yeast is responsible for fermentating the sugars and creating alcohol. It also influences the color and flavor of the beer and effects the alcohol content. Often yeast is filtered out of beer after fermenting but sometimes left in to add cloudiness.

Old Fashioned Lager Beer

KCLager 12oz

KCLite 12oz

KC LiteTM and KC LagerTM are golden in color with light aromas of malt and grain. They have a pleasant hoppy bitterness with a clean crisp finish. KC LiteTM and KC LagerTM are made in small batches and handcrafted using pure 2-row barley grown and malted in Biggar, Saskatchewan, premium hops from the Pacific NW, deep well water and a proprietary yeast. It is placed in cold storage (lagered) for a minimum of 35 days resulting in a clean, crisp, smooth tasting beer. These are refreshing old fashioned lager beers that pair well with medium to sharp cheeses, steaks, spicy sausages, grilled vegetables, and robust pasta dishes.

What To Look For

KCLager Retail Card

Retail Display

KCLite Retail Card

How Kansas City Breweries Company Began in 1905…

“Significant Breweries in Kansas City by FangKC Sat Jan 19, 2008” http://kcrag.com/viewtopic.php?t=13755

The Imperial Brewery was formed by George Schraubstadter and a group of saloon keepers in 1901. The address was 2825 Southwest Boulevard in what was then called Walruff’s Grove. The building was constructed by contractor Ludwig Breitag.

The cost of construction of the building was $500,000 with a production capacity of 50,000 barrels. Brewing began in April of 1902.  A later expansion added a two-story administrative building and a two-story bottling works.  The brewery’s two brands were lager-style beers called Mayflower and Imperial Seal.

In 1904, an ice-making plant was constructed.

In December of 1905, The Ferdinand Heim Brewing Company acquired the Rochester Brewery (formerly called J.D. Iler Brewing Company) at Chestnut and Rochester in the East Bottoms. The Heim Brewery was located adjacent to the Iler/Rochester brewing plant in the East Bottoms off of Chestnut Trafficway. The site was also location for the first Electric Park operated by the Heim Brothers. A  new company was formed called the Kansas City Breweries Company.  

The new company also purchased the Imperial Brewery at auction, after Imperial had several years of financial problems.  This consolidation was considered the single most important event in the City’s brewing history since the merged company became Kansas City’s largest brewer.

The newly consolidated company made improvements at the Imperial plant, and the name was changed from Imperial branch to Rochester Brewing “B” Plant. In 1911, the consolidated breweries produced 338,332 barrels of beer. The output consisted of three primary brands: Heim Special, Rochester Bohemian, and Old Fashioned Lager.  The Mayflower and Imperial Sealbrands ceased to exist.  Old Fashioned Lager became the company’s staple brand.

In 1911, a non-alcoholic “near-beer” was first produced called “Puritan” and was marketed mostly in Kansas.  During Prohibition, the plant produced near-beer and soda water.

Ads at the time recommended the 0.5 percent Puritan “near-beer” for consumption as a refreshing and invigorating beverage for every member of the family. The ad depicted a small child enjoying the beverage.  

During Prohibition, other local breweries also sold a version of the cereal near-beer beverage: Lemp made Cerva; Pabst sold Happy Hoppy; Muehlebach made Mulo; Anheuser Busch made Bevo, among others.

In 1919, the office building and storage house were sold to an oil company, and later the remaining brewing property west of Turkey Creek was sold to Seaboard Milling Company. The flourmill began producing up to 1,200 barrels of flour daily, and blended another 1,200 barrels daily.

“Significant Breweries in Kansas City by FangKC Sat Jan 19, 2008” http://kcrag.com/viewtopic.php?t=13755

The Imperial Brewery was formed by George Schraubstadter and a group of saloon keepers in 1901. The address was 2825 Southwest Boulevard in what was then called Walruff’s Grove. The building was constructed by contractor Ludwig Breitag.

The cost of construction of the building was $500,000 with a production capacity of 50,000 barrels. Brewing began in April of 1902.  A later expansion added a two-story administrative building and a two-story bottling works.  The brewery’s two brands were lager-style beers called Mayflower and Imperial Seal.

In 1904, an ice-making plant was constructed.

In December of 1905, The Ferdinand Heim Brewing Company acquired the Rochester Brewery (formerly called J.D. Iler Brewing Company) at Chestnut and Rochester in the East Bottoms. The Heim Brewery was located adjacent to the Iler/Rochester brewing plant in the East Bottoms off of Chestnut Trafficway. The site was also location for the first Electric Park operated by the Heim Brothers. A  new company was formed called the Kansas City Breweries Company.  

The new company also purchased the Imperial Brewery at auction, after Imperial had several years of financial problems.  This consolidation was considered the single most important event in the City’s brewing history since the merged company became Kansas City’s largest brewer.

The newly consolidated company made improvements at the Imperial plant, and the name was changed from Imperial branch to Rochester Brewing “B” Plant. In 1911, the consolidated breweries produced 338,332 barrels of beer. The output consisted of three primary brands: Heim Special, Rochester Bohemian, and Old Fashioned Lager.  The Mayflower and Imperial Sealbrands ceased to exist.  Old Fashioned Lager became the company’s staple brand.

In 1911, a non-alcoholic “near-beer” was first produced called “Puritan” and was marketed mostly in Kansas.  During Prohibition, the plant produced near-beer and soda water.

Ads at the time recommended the 0.5 percent Puritan “near-beer” for consumption as a refreshing and invigorating beverage for every member of the family. The ad depicted a small child enjoying the beverage.  

During Prohibition, other local breweries also sold a version of the cereal near-beer beverage: Lemp made Cerva; Pabst sold Happy Hoppy; Muehlebach made Mulo; Anheuser Busch made Bevo, among others.

In 1919, the office building and storage house were sold to an oil company, and later the remaining brewing property west of Turkey Creek was sold to Seaboard Milling Company. The flourmill began producing up to 1,200 barrels of flour daily, and blended another 1,200 barrels daily.